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Who’d be a better boss: Clinton or Trump?

​57 PERCENT OF WORKERS SAY THEY WOULD PREFER TO WORK FOR HILLARY CLINTON; 43 PERCENT SAY THEY WOULD LIKE DONALD TRUMP AS A BOSS.

57 PERCENT OF WORKERS SAY THEY WOULD PREFER TO WORK FOR HILLARY CLINTON; 43 PERCENT SAY THEY WOULD LIKE DONALD TRUMP AS A BOSS.

It's one thing to want someone to be president, but which candidate would you rather have as a boss? In a way, candidates go through a job interview — more a media war than a focused grilling session — but over the election season Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have shown us what kind of leaders they would be. Voters have asked themselves: What kind of decision maker would Trump be? If Clinton were CEO of a troubled company, what would she do?

According to a new CareerBuilder survey, 57 percent of workers say they would prefer to work for the former Secretary of State – while the remaining 43 percent say they would like the businessman as a boss.

Clinton was firmly preferred by women in the survey with 62 percent saying they would choose the former senator as a boss. Men were tighter in their decision between candidates, with an even split between Clinton and Trump. Broken down by race, 52 percent of workers that identify as Caucasian would like Trump as their boss. On the other hand, Clinton was the preferred choice among African American (87 percent), Hispanic (79 percent) and Asian (78 percent) professionals.

Should you talk politics at work?

With less than a week until Election Day, and with politics as heated as it has been this election cycle, it's hard to resist the desire to talk about what's going on with your co-workers. But is the office the right place to discuss whether you are a Clinton or Trump fan and which would be the better boss?

You may not realize it, but many offices have rules that prohibit wearing political clothing or bringing campaign material into the workplace. Make sure you know your company's policies before sending political emails, wearing your campaign pins or chit-chatting at the water cooler. If it is allowed, make it a rule of thumb to keep conversations as friendly and as lighthearted as possible. Ask non-confrontational questions, keep an open mind and be sincere.

And even after work, when talking politics is technically OK, it's still best to tread lightly when with co-workers. Although it may seem unfair, knowing your personal politics can change someone's opinion of you (and of your work). That said, when you work closely with colleagues every day, chances are you have an idea of where they fall on the political spectrum. If you insist on talking politics after hours, consider these social cues before broaching or engaging in conversation about politics.

Need tips on striking up a conversation with co-workers? Check out The why and how of making friends at work